Thursday, November 4, 2010

People Making Money Net


I sincerely hope followers of the Network Neutrality (NN) debate were wearing their seatbelts last week.  The pro-NN Media Marxists’ rapid lurch in position on the issue would otherwise have ensured full chiropractor employment for a pronounced period of time.



What led to this The-Ends-Justify-Any-Means-Necessary backflip is the Cablevision-Fox dustup over fees Cablevision pays Fox to retransmit the latter’s programming.  The two parties couldn’t reach an agreement, the contract elapsed and Fox pulled its channels from the Cablevision lineup.


Fox then went a step further, temporarily making some of its online content unavailable to Cablevision subscribers.


Let us be clear what happened here.  The Content Provider (Fox) had prevented the Internet Service Provider (Cablevision) from access to its online content.


And after all, it is Fox’s property.  They paid a LOT of money for its creation, development and deployment – they can do with it whatever they wish.  They can offer it to whomever, or not offer it to anyone at all.  If they want to withhold some or all of it from some or all people, that is their prerogative – especially when they are not being paid for it.


It is here that the pro-Net Neutrality crowd jumped the intellectual shark.  Well, again.  They asserted that Fox – by not giving away their property online – was in violation of the Media Marxists’ warped definition of NN.


And that Fox’s “violation” served as further “justification” for Federal Communications Commission (FCC)-mandated Net Neutrality – and the radical, extra-lawful Internet power grab they have been demanding the FCC make so as to commandeer the authority necessary to enact and enforce it.


(An investment-devastating move which the FCC may very well execute as soon as November 30th.)


FCC Commissioner Michael Copps said in a statement:


For a broadcaster to pull programming from the Internet for a cable company’s subscribers, as apparently happened here, directly threatens the open Internet.


And Art Brodsky, Director of Communications for Public Knowledge, wrote:


Fox committed what should be considered one of the grossest violations of the open Internet committed by a U.S. company….


In this case, of course, it’s the content provider that was doing the blocking…. (B)ut it shouldn’t matter who is keeping consumers away from the lawful content….


If one values the open Internet, however, there should be rules against that sort of thing, whether the blocking is done by the ISP or by a content provider….


Yes, it would be nice if someone (like the FCC) could step in and tell Fox that it is unacceptable to block Internet content.


For years these Leftists have been vociferously insisting that the enemies of NN are the evil Internet Service Providers – who would allegedly block access to online fare.  And thusly Net Neutrality was required to stop them from so doing.


But by attempting to frame the Cablevision-Fox dispute in NN terms – by demanding that Fox give away its content to everyone – the pro-NN gaggle clearly demonstrates that this fight is not (just) about ACCESS to Internet content – it is about GOVERNMENT CONTROL of Internet content.


They seek to neutralize the Internet – by having the government control its content.


Of course, they have all along stridently asserted that Net Neutrality is not about this.


Right-wing media have falsely claimed that the net neutrality principle supported by the Obama administration is an attempt by the government to control Internet content. In fact, net neutrality does not mean government control of content on the Internet; rather, net neutrality ensures equal and open access for consumers and producers of content and applications…


But their demands of Fox clearly demonstrate that it is.


Yesterday, it was about access to content.  Today, it’s the government demanding content providers give away the products they produce.


Tomorrow, it will be the government demanding content providers pull from the Web the products they produce.  Shutting you up by insisting you shut it down.


After all, government control is government control.  Once they have it, they have it all the way.


How pathetically sad it is that the ACLU – the alleged champion of the First Amendment – has so readily sacrificed it on the altar of Leftist ideology.  And done so in such an intellectually vacuous fashion – the First Amendment protects us from GOVERNMENT censorship, not the actions of private companies or individuals.


To say that force feeding the nation Net Neutrality is a First Amendment imperative is both factually and morally bankrupt.





Few people are more highly regarded in the blogging-for-business world than Darren Rowse of ProBlogger.net. He has essentially set the blueprint for how to turn a blog into a business, and is one of the go-to sources for tips on how to do as much. He had a chat with WebProNews at BlogWorld last week, after speaking in one of the more popular keynotes at the event. 



Rowse discussed with us how people can get started blogging, and eventually turn their blogs into moneymakers. "You need a blog to start with, then really my first priority would be getting some useful content on there - some content that's actually going to solve some problems for people," he said. "So if you're blog's a how-to type blog, you want to start thinking 'what's a beginner in this topic need to know?' and start writing that type of content that you can be referring back to later, so that when you start promoting it, you've got content there that they'll find, that is engaging for them. So that is probably the first step, and then, it's about putting yourself out there, and trying to find some readers."



Have you been able to turn your blog into a business? Let us know. 



If the how-to path is the one you're interested in traveling, I'd reccommend reading this article, discussing ways to create effective how-to articles, with tips provided by John Hewitt, who has written technical manuals for companies like IBM, Intuit, and Motorola. 



Either way, "First you want to know who you want to attract, because it's kind of easy to get noticed on the Internet, but if you do it in the wrong way, you could actually 1. take yourself further away from your goals, but 2. find the wrong readers," noted Rowse. "You could get..readers from a place like Digg or StumbleUpon...some of these social bookmarking sites, but they may not actually be the type of person that you want to journey with for the whole long term. So define who you want to reach, and ask the question, 'where can I find them online?'" 



"Answering that question, for me, on my photography site led me to Flickr. Flickr's a place where people have cameras, and not everyone takes great photos, so it was a place for me to develop a presence. For other blogs, it may lead you to Twitter or Facebook or another blog or a forum that is related to your particular niche."



Forums can actually be great for your brand (in some cases, maybe even more so than Facebook or Twitter). Forums are a good source of relevant discussion to your niche, provided you engage in the right places. They can help you establish yourself as an expert (not unlike Q&A sites), and they can be particularly good for building a search presence. Forum threads do really well in Google for certain queries, particularly when someone is looking for help with something. 



"I think a lot of bloggers treat their blog as a hobby, and I mean, that certainly is the way I started out," Rowse told us. "I didn't realize you could make money from blogging when I started. But my wife kind of gave me an ultimatum after a while. I'd began to dream about my blog becoming a business, and certainly was moving in that direction...one day, she kind of said, 'you need to do it'. Then she gave me six months to get it done."



"Once I had that ultimatum, and that deadline in mind, it just switched in my mind and started making me thinking of it as a business now, and really that was the turning point for me, because I began to think more strategically about who was reading my blog, what they needed, and products that I could launch to them," he continued. "But also, I got on the phone for the fist time and started ringing advertisers to create a direct relationship with them."



Rowse recently discussed using temporary blogs as stepping stones for your broader goals:




bench craft company

<b>News</b> - Blake Lively, Leonardo DiCaprio Go Out for Dinner - Movies <b>...</b>

Home | News | Style & Beauty | Moms & Babies | Movies, TV & Music | Healthy Lifestyle | Celebrities � Photos | Video. Subscribe: Magazine | Newsletter | RSS � Subscriber Services | Media Kit | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use ...

For Fox <b>News</b>, Most Viewers Ever for a Midterm Election - NYTimes.com

Fox News, a favorite of Republicans, averaged 6.96 million viewers in prime time on Tuesday, according to ratings results from the Nielsen Company. Fox more than doubled CNN's numbers, which averaged 2.42 million viewers, and more than ...

<b>News</b> Corp&#39;s Carey: MySpace&#39;s Ongoing Losses &#39;Not Acceptable Or <b>...</b>

Continued MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) declines pulled down News Corp.'s digital media group earnings again in its first quarter, meaning operating losses in the company's Other segment grew by $30 million from last year, to $156 million. ...


bench craft company

I sincerely hope followers of the Network Neutrality (NN) debate were wearing their seatbelts last week.  The pro-NN Media Marxists’ rapid lurch in position on the issue would otherwise have ensured full chiropractor employment for a pronounced period of time.



What led to this The-Ends-Justify-Any-Means-Necessary backflip is the Cablevision-Fox dustup over fees Cablevision pays Fox to retransmit the latter’s programming.  The two parties couldn’t reach an agreement, the contract elapsed and Fox pulled its channels from the Cablevision lineup.


Fox then went a step further, temporarily making some of its online content unavailable to Cablevision subscribers.


Let us be clear what happened here.  The Content Provider (Fox) had prevented the Internet Service Provider (Cablevision) from access to its online content.


And after all, it is Fox’s property.  They paid a LOT of money for its creation, development and deployment – they can do with it whatever they wish.  They can offer it to whomever, or not offer it to anyone at all.  If they want to withhold some or all of it from some or all people, that is their prerogative – especially when they are not being paid for it.


It is here that the pro-Net Neutrality crowd jumped the intellectual shark.  Well, again.  They asserted that Fox – by not giving away their property online – was in violation of the Media Marxists’ warped definition of NN.


And that Fox’s “violation” served as further “justification” for Federal Communications Commission (FCC)-mandated Net Neutrality – and the radical, extra-lawful Internet power grab they have been demanding the FCC make so as to commandeer the authority necessary to enact and enforce it.


(An investment-devastating move which the FCC may very well execute as soon as November 30th.)


FCC Commissioner Michael Copps said in a statement:


For a broadcaster to pull programming from the Internet for a cable company’s subscribers, as apparently happened here, directly threatens the open Internet.


And Art Brodsky, Director of Communications for Public Knowledge, wrote:


Fox committed what should be considered one of the grossest violations of the open Internet committed by a U.S. company….


In this case, of course, it’s the content provider that was doing the blocking…. (B)ut it shouldn’t matter who is keeping consumers away from the lawful content….


If one values the open Internet, however, there should be rules against that sort of thing, whether the blocking is done by the ISP or by a content provider….


Yes, it would be nice if someone (like the FCC) could step in and tell Fox that it is unacceptable to block Internet content.


For years these Leftists have been vociferously insisting that the enemies of NN are the evil Internet Service Providers – who would allegedly block access to online fare.  And thusly Net Neutrality was required to stop them from so doing.


But by attempting to frame the Cablevision-Fox dispute in NN terms – by demanding that Fox give away its content to everyone – the pro-NN gaggle clearly demonstrates that this fight is not (just) about ACCESS to Internet content – it is about GOVERNMENT CONTROL of Internet content.


They seek to neutralize the Internet – by having the government control its content.


Of course, they have all along stridently asserted that Net Neutrality is not about this.


Right-wing media have falsely claimed that the net neutrality principle supported by the Obama administration is an attempt by the government to control Internet content. In fact, net neutrality does not mean government control of content on the Internet; rather, net neutrality ensures equal and open access for consumers and producers of content and applications…


But their demands of Fox clearly demonstrate that it is.


Yesterday, it was about access to content.  Today, it’s the government demanding content providers give away the products they produce.


Tomorrow, it will be the government demanding content providers pull from the Web the products they produce.  Shutting you up by insisting you shut it down.


After all, government control is government control.  Once they have it, they have it all the way.


How pathetically sad it is that the ACLU – the alleged champion of the First Amendment – has so readily sacrificed it on the altar of Leftist ideology.  And done so in such an intellectually vacuous fashion – the First Amendment protects us from GOVERNMENT censorship, not the actions of private companies or individuals.


To say that force feeding the nation Net Neutrality is a First Amendment imperative is both factually and morally bankrupt.





Few people are more highly regarded in the blogging-for-business world than Darren Rowse of ProBlogger.net. He has essentially set the blueprint for how to turn a blog into a business, and is one of the go-to sources for tips on how to do as much. He had a chat with WebProNews at BlogWorld last week, after speaking in one of the more popular keynotes at the event. 



Rowse discussed with us how people can get started blogging, and eventually turn their blogs into moneymakers. "You need a blog to start with, then really my first priority would be getting some useful content on there - some content that's actually going to solve some problems for people," he said. "So if you're blog's a how-to type blog, you want to start thinking 'what's a beginner in this topic need to know?' and start writing that type of content that you can be referring back to later, so that when you start promoting it, you've got content there that they'll find, that is engaging for them. So that is probably the first step, and then, it's about putting yourself out there, and trying to find some readers."



Have you been able to turn your blog into a business? Let us know. 



If the how-to path is the one you're interested in traveling, I'd reccommend reading this article, discussing ways to create effective how-to articles, with tips provided by John Hewitt, who has written technical manuals for companies like IBM, Intuit, and Motorola. 



Either way, "First you want to know who you want to attract, because it's kind of easy to get noticed on the Internet, but if you do it in the wrong way, you could actually 1. take yourself further away from your goals, but 2. find the wrong readers," noted Rowse. "You could get..readers from a place like Digg or StumbleUpon...some of these social bookmarking sites, but they may not actually be the type of person that you want to journey with for the whole long term. So define who you want to reach, and ask the question, 'where can I find them online?'" 



"Answering that question, for me, on my photography site led me to Flickr. Flickr's a place where people have cameras, and not everyone takes great photos, so it was a place for me to develop a presence. For other blogs, it may lead you to Twitter or Facebook or another blog or a forum that is related to your particular niche."



Forums can actually be great for your brand (in some cases, maybe even more so than Facebook or Twitter). Forums are a good source of relevant discussion to your niche, provided you engage in the right places. They can help you establish yourself as an expert (not unlike Q&A sites), and they can be particularly good for building a search presence. Forum threads do really well in Google for certain queries, particularly when someone is looking for help with something. 



"I think a lot of bloggers treat their blog as a hobby, and I mean, that certainly is the way I started out," Rowse told us. "I didn't realize you could make money from blogging when I started. But my wife kind of gave me an ultimatum after a while. I'd began to dream about my blog becoming a business, and certainly was moving in that direction...one day, she kind of said, 'you need to do it'. Then she gave me six months to get it done."



"Once I had that ultimatum, and that deadline in mind, it just switched in my mind and started making me thinking of it as a business now, and really that was the turning point for me, because I began to think more strategically about who was reading my blog, what they needed, and products that I could launch to them," he continued. "But also, I got on the phone for the fist time and started ringing advertisers to create a direct relationship with them."



Rowse recently discussed using temporary blogs as stepping stones for your broader goals:




bench craft company

<b>News</b> - Blake Lively, Leonardo DiCaprio Go Out for Dinner - Movies <b>...</b>

Home | News | Style & Beauty | Moms & Babies | Movies, TV & Music | Healthy Lifestyle | Celebrities � Photos | Video. Subscribe: Magazine | Newsletter | RSS � Subscriber Services | Media Kit | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use ...

For Fox <b>News</b>, Most Viewers Ever for a Midterm Election - NYTimes.com

Fox News, a favorite of Republicans, averaged 6.96 million viewers in prime time on Tuesday, according to ratings results from the Nielsen Company. Fox more than doubled CNN's numbers, which averaged 2.42 million viewers, and more than ...

<b>News</b> Corp&#39;s Carey: MySpace&#39;s Ongoing Losses &#39;Not Acceptable Or <b>...</b>

Continued MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) declines pulled down News Corp.'s digital media group earnings again in its first quarter, meaning operating losses in the company's Other segment grew by $30 million from last year, to $156 million. ...


bench craft company

bench craft company

Money where your mouth is by earthdog


bench craft company

<b>News</b> - Blake Lively, Leonardo DiCaprio Go Out for Dinner - Movies <b>...</b>

Home | News | Style & Beauty | Moms & Babies | Movies, TV & Music | Healthy Lifestyle | Celebrities � Photos | Video. Subscribe: Magazine | Newsletter | RSS � Subscriber Services | Media Kit | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use ...

For Fox <b>News</b>, Most Viewers Ever for a Midterm Election - NYTimes.com

Fox News, a favorite of Republicans, averaged 6.96 million viewers in prime time on Tuesday, according to ratings results from the Nielsen Company. Fox more than doubled CNN's numbers, which averaged 2.42 million viewers, and more than ...

<b>News</b> Corp&#39;s Carey: MySpace&#39;s Ongoing Losses &#39;Not Acceptable Or <b>...</b>

Continued MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) declines pulled down News Corp.'s digital media group earnings again in its first quarter, meaning operating losses in the company's Other segment grew by $30 million from last year, to $156 million. ...


bench craft company

I sincerely hope followers of the Network Neutrality (NN) debate were wearing their seatbelts last week.  The pro-NN Media Marxists’ rapid lurch in position on the issue would otherwise have ensured full chiropractor employment for a pronounced period of time.



What led to this The-Ends-Justify-Any-Means-Necessary backflip is the Cablevision-Fox dustup over fees Cablevision pays Fox to retransmit the latter’s programming.  The two parties couldn’t reach an agreement, the contract elapsed and Fox pulled its channels from the Cablevision lineup.


Fox then went a step further, temporarily making some of its online content unavailable to Cablevision subscribers.


Let us be clear what happened here.  The Content Provider (Fox) had prevented the Internet Service Provider (Cablevision) from access to its online content.


And after all, it is Fox’s property.  They paid a LOT of money for its creation, development and deployment – they can do with it whatever they wish.  They can offer it to whomever, or not offer it to anyone at all.  If they want to withhold some or all of it from some or all people, that is their prerogative – especially when they are not being paid for it.


It is here that the pro-Net Neutrality crowd jumped the intellectual shark.  Well, again.  They asserted that Fox – by not giving away their property online – was in violation of the Media Marxists’ warped definition of NN.


And that Fox’s “violation” served as further “justification” for Federal Communications Commission (FCC)-mandated Net Neutrality – and the radical, extra-lawful Internet power grab they have been demanding the FCC make so as to commandeer the authority necessary to enact and enforce it.


(An investment-devastating move which the FCC may very well execute as soon as November 30th.)


FCC Commissioner Michael Copps said in a statement:


For a broadcaster to pull programming from the Internet for a cable company’s subscribers, as apparently happened here, directly threatens the open Internet.


And Art Brodsky, Director of Communications for Public Knowledge, wrote:


Fox committed what should be considered one of the grossest violations of the open Internet committed by a U.S. company….


In this case, of course, it’s the content provider that was doing the blocking…. (B)ut it shouldn’t matter who is keeping consumers away from the lawful content….


If one values the open Internet, however, there should be rules against that sort of thing, whether the blocking is done by the ISP or by a content provider….


Yes, it would be nice if someone (like the FCC) could step in and tell Fox that it is unacceptable to block Internet content.


For years these Leftists have been vociferously insisting that the enemies of NN are the evil Internet Service Providers – who would allegedly block access to online fare.  And thusly Net Neutrality was required to stop them from so doing.


But by attempting to frame the Cablevision-Fox dispute in NN terms – by demanding that Fox give away its content to everyone – the pro-NN gaggle clearly demonstrates that this fight is not (just) about ACCESS to Internet content – it is about GOVERNMENT CONTROL of Internet content.


They seek to neutralize the Internet – by having the government control its content.


Of course, they have all along stridently asserted that Net Neutrality is not about this.


Right-wing media have falsely claimed that the net neutrality principle supported by the Obama administration is an attempt by the government to control Internet content. In fact, net neutrality does not mean government control of content on the Internet; rather, net neutrality ensures equal and open access for consumers and producers of content and applications…


But their demands of Fox clearly demonstrate that it is.


Yesterday, it was about access to content.  Today, it’s the government demanding content providers give away the products they produce.


Tomorrow, it will be the government demanding content providers pull from the Web the products they produce.  Shutting you up by insisting you shut it down.


After all, government control is government control.  Once they have it, they have it all the way.


How pathetically sad it is that the ACLU – the alleged champion of the First Amendment – has so readily sacrificed it on the altar of Leftist ideology.  And done so in such an intellectually vacuous fashion – the First Amendment protects us from GOVERNMENT censorship, not the actions of private companies or individuals.


To say that force feeding the nation Net Neutrality is a First Amendment imperative is both factually and morally bankrupt.





Few people are more highly regarded in the blogging-for-business world than Darren Rowse of ProBlogger.net. He has essentially set the blueprint for how to turn a blog into a business, and is one of the go-to sources for tips on how to do as much. He had a chat with WebProNews at BlogWorld last week, after speaking in one of the more popular keynotes at the event. 



Rowse discussed with us how people can get started blogging, and eventually turn their blogs into moneymakers. "You need a blog to start with, then really my first priority would be getting some useful content on there - some content that's actually going to solve some problems for people," he said. "So if you're blog's a how-to type blog, you want to start thinking 'what's a beginner in this topic need to know?' and start writing that type of content that you can be referring back to later, so that when you start promoting it, you've got content there that they'll find, that is engaging for them. So that is probably the first step, and then, it's about putting yourself out there, and trying to find some readers."



Have you been able to turn your blog into a business? Let us know. 



If the how-to path is the one you're interested in traveling, I'd reccommend reading this article, discussing ways to create effective how-to articles, with tips provided by John Hewitt, who has written technical manuals for companies like IBM, Intuit, and Motorola. 



Either way, "First you want to know who you want to attract, because it's kind of easy to get noticed on the Internet, but if you do it in the wrong way, you could actually 1. take yourself further away from your goals, but 2. find the wrong readers," noted Rowse. "You could get..readers from a place like Digg or StumbleUpon...some of these social bookmarking sites, but they may not actually be the type of person that you want to journey with for the whole long term. So define who you want to reach, and ask the question, 'where can I find them online?'" 



"Answering that question, for me, on my photography site led me to Flickr. Flickr's a place where people have cameras, and not everyone takes great photos, so it was a place for me to develop a presence. For other blogs, it may lead you to Twitter or Facebook or another blog or a forum that is related to your particular niche."



Forums can actually be great for your brand (in some cases, maybe even more so than Facebook or Twitter). Forums are a good source of relevant discussion to your niche, provided you engage in the right places. They can help you establish yourself as an expert (not unlike Q&A sites), and they can be particularly good for building a search presence. Forum threads do really well in Google for certain queries, particularly when someone is looking for help with something. 



"I think a lot of bloggers treat their blog as a hobby, and I mean, that certainly is the way I started out," Rowse told us. "I didn't realize you could make money from blogging when I started. But my wife kind of gave me an ultimatum after a while. I'd began to dream about my blog becoming a business, and certainly was moving in that direction...one day, she kind of said, 'you need to do it'. Then she gave me six months to get it done."



"Once I had that ultimatum, and that deadline in mind, it just switched in my mind and started making me thinking of it as a business now, and really that was the turning point for me, because I began to think more strategically about who was reading my blog, what they needed, and products that I could launch to them," he continued. "But also, I got on the phone for the fist time and started ringing advertisers to create a direct relationship with them."



Rowse recently discussed using temporary blogs as stepping stones for your broader goals:




bench craft company

Money where your mouth is by earthdog


bench craft company

<b>News</b> - Blake Lively, Leonardo DiCaprio Go Out for Dinner - Movies <b>...</b>

Home | News | Style & Beauty | Moms & Babies | Movies, TV & Music | Healthy Lifestyle | Celebrities � Photos | Video. Subscribe: Magazine | Newsletter | RSS � Subscriber Services | Media Kit | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use ...

For Fox <b>News</b>, Most Viewers Ever for a Midterm Election - NYTimes.com

Fox News, a favorite of Republicans, averaged 6.96 million viewers in prime time on Tuesday, according to ratings results from the Nielsen Company. Fox more than doubled CNN's numbers, which averaged 2.42 million viewers, and more than ...

<b>News</b> Corp&#39;s Carey: MySpace&#39;s Ongoing Losses &#39;Not Acceptable Or <b>...</b>

Continued MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) declines pulled down News Corp.'s digital media group earnings again in its first quarter, meaning operating losses in the company's Other segment grew by $30 million from last year, to $156 million. ...


bench craft company

Money where your mouth is by earthdog


bench craft company

<b>News</b> - Blake Lively, Leonardo DiCaprio Go Out for Dinner - Movies <b>...</b>

Home | News | Style & Beauty | Moms & Babies | Movies, TV & Music | Healthy Lifestyle | Celebrities � Photos | Video. Subscribe: Magazine | Newsletter | RSS � Subscriber Services | Media Kit | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use ...

For Fox <b>News</b>, Most Viewers Ever for a Midterm Election - NYTimes.com

Fox News, a favorite of Republicans, averaged 6.96 million viewers in prime time on Tuesday, according to ratings results from the Nielsen Company. Fox more than doubled CNN's numbers, which averaged 2.42 million viewers, and more than ...

<b>News</b> Corp&#39;s Carey: MySpace&#39;s Ongoing Losses &#39;Not Acceptable Or <b>...</b>

Continued MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) declines pulled down News Corp.'s digital media group earnings again in its first quarter, meaning operating losses in the company's Other segment grew by $30 million from last year, to $156 million. ...


bench craft company

<b>News</b> - Blake Lively, Leonardo DiCaprio Go Out for Dinner - Movies <b>...</b>

Home | News | Style & Beauty | Moms & Babies | Movies, TV & Music | Healthy Lifestyle | Celebrities � Photos | Video. Subscribe: Magazine | Newsletter | RSS � Subscriber Services | Media Kit | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use ...

For Fox <b>News</b>, Most Viewers Ever for a Midterm Election - NYTimes.com

Fox News, a favorite of Republicans, averaged 6.96 million viewers in prime time on Tuesday, according to ratings results from the Nielsen Company. Fox more than doubled CNN's numbers, which averaged 2.42 million viewers, and more than ...

<b>News</b> Corp&#39;s Carey: MySpace&#39;s Ongoing Losses &#39;Not Acceptable Or <b>...</b>

Continued MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) declines pulled down News Corp.'s digital media group earnings again in its first quarter, meaning operating losses in the company's Other segment grew by $30 million from last year, to $156 million. ...


bench craft company

<b>News</b> - Blake Lively, Leonardo DiCaprio Go Out for Dinner - Movies <b>...</b>

Home | News | Style & Beauty | Moms & Babies | Movies, TV & Music | Healthy Lifestyle | Celebrities � Photos | Video. Subscribe: Magazine | Newsletter | RSS � Subscriber Services | Media Kit | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use ...

For Fox <b>News</b>, Most Viewers Ever for a Midterm Election - NYTimes.com

Fox News, a favorite of Republicans, averaged 6.96 million viewers in prime time on Tuesday, according to ratings results from the Nielsen Company. Fox more than doubled CNN's numbers, which averaged 2.42 million viewers, and more than ...

<b>News</b> Corp&#39;s Carey: MySpace&#39;s Ongoing Losses &#39;Not Acceptable Or <b>...</b>

Continued MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) declines pulled down News Corp.'s digital media group earnings again in its first quarter, meaning operating losses in the company's Other segment grew by $30 million from last year, to $156 million. ...


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bench craft company

Money where your mouth is by earthdog


bench craft company
bench craft company

<b>News</b> - Blake Lively, Leonardo DiCaprio Go Out for Dinner - Movies <b>...</b>

Home | News | Style & Beauty | Moms & Babies | Movies, TV & Music | Healthy Lifestyle | Celebrities � Photos | Video. Subscribe: Magazine | Newsletter | RSS � Subscriber Services | Media Kit | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use ...

For Fox <b>News</b>, Most Viewers Ever for a Midterm Election - NYTimes.com

Fox News, a favorite of Republicans, averaged 6.96 million viewers in prime time on Tuesday, according to ratings results from the Nielsen Company. Fox more than doubled CNN's numbers, which averaged 2.42 million viewers, and more than ...

<b>News</b> Corp&#39;s Carey: MySpace&#39;s Ongoing Losses &#39;Not Acceptable Or <b>...</b>

Continued MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) declines pulled down News Corp.'s digital media group earnings again in its first quarter, meaning operating losses in the company's Other segment grew by $30 million from last year, to $156 million. ...


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Did you realize that you can make money from blogs? Do you believe that you could make money with this new craze? Well let it be known, that yes people really are generating more business to their companies and they are making money. When it comes right down to it, blogging can easily enlarge your net authority, and increase credibility and market value. Many people claim that the business they have gotten has increased significantly as a result of blogging.

The object is to have a niche and to keep everything small. The general premise of a blog is to sell an idea, anyone who makes blogs are not merely asking for money because of the blog itself, the ideas are the star of the show and the blog is merely the vessel to transport it to the clients. It is one of the best ways to gain reputation in business networking, this in turn leads to more business and finally to what you have been striving for which is profit.

They are kind of like a tool that you need to transport information in short bursts, as to not confuse or overwhelm the customer. By keeping them short, many business people believe that the original message or core idea remains intact. There is thought amongst the net industry that far more intangible ideas and products are being peddled online these days, this in turn decreases paid content value, rerouting the connection between the business and the client is the primary goal.

One of the best methods to date, to generate business and profit is to employ a good blogger. Bloggers have a way of gaining trust; they also can capture the market with the use of strategic reputation. Microsoft is one of the leading employers of the blogging trend, and uses the blogs on all their sites and sales pitches. Microsoft feels that if they have multiple blogs that give small portions of information and tid-bits, of needed content they can reach a broader market and keep people informed on what they are doing in the business and any market adjustments that may come your way. It doesn't hurt to patternize these successful companies.

If more companies go this route, you could easily see a change in the face of business. Faster communication between client and company, more precise information packets that are not stressing to understand, and an overall cleaner appearance are the goal with the blogging industry. These little vessels of information just may be here to stay.

Get yourself a blog today or you are missing out on a lot of potential business and subsequent profits.





















































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